What Is Politically Correct Term For Handicapped?

What do we call a handicapped person?

The preferred terms to use these days are “disability” and “disabled.” These words have replaced “handicap” and “handicapped.” It’s no longer OK to call someone “handicapped” (5), but it is acceptable to use “handicapped” in common phrases such as “handicapped parking.”.

How do you say mentally challenged in a nice way?

Mentally retarded: Always try to specify the type of disability being referenced. Otherwise, the terms mental disability, intellectual disability and developmental disability are acceptable. See entry on mentally retarded/mentally disabled, intellectually disabled, developmentally disabled .

How do you refer to someone with a disability?

In general, refer to the person first and the disability second. People with disabilities are, first and foremost, people. Labeling a person equates the person with a condition and can be disrespectful and dehumanizing.

Why is the term handicapped offensive?

By the 1970’s changes were developing and terms like cripple, lame, gimp and a host of others became offensive terms because they focused on a person’s deficits rather than the person themselves. Over time, “Handicapped” began to be replaced by the term disabled.

Is it politically correct to say special needs?

The New Term for Special Needs Disability. It’s ok to say the word. … I’m not special, special needs, handicapable, differently abled or challenged. There’s nothing wrong with being a disabled person.

Is it OK to say able bodied?

In referring to people with disabilities, it is preferable to use language that focuses on their abilities rather than their disabilities. Therefore, the use of the terms “handicapped,” “able-bodied,” “physically challenged,” and “differently abled” is discouraged. … Use “non-disabled” instead.

What do you say to someone who is disabled?

Put the person first. Say “person with a disability” rather than “disabled person.” Say “people with disabilities” rather than “the disabled.” For specific disabilities, saying “person with Tourette syndrome” or “person who has cerebral palsy” is usually a safe bet. Still, individuals do have their own preferences.

What is difference between handicap and disability?

As traditionally used, impairment refers to a problem with a structure or organ of the body; disability is a functional limitation with regard to a particular activity; and handicap refers to a disadvantage in filling a role in life relative to a peer group.

Is disabled and handicapped the same thing?

The short answer is NO. Disability and handicapped do not mean the same thing. And the differences are important. … “A HANDICAP is viewed as a disadvantage resulting from a disability that limits or prevents fulfillment.”

What can I say instead of handicapped?

When talking about places with accommodations for people with disabilities, use the term “accessible” rather than “disabled” or “handicapped.” For example, refer to an “accessible” parking space rather than a “disabled” or “handicapped” parking space or “an accessible bathroom stall” rather than “a handicapped bathroom …